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Electronic Throttle Body

Aftermarket electronic throttle assembly by Spectra Premium

The Electronic Throttle Body (ETB) is the digital brainchild of the old throttle control, which used a mechanical link between the pedal and throttle. On the electronic throttle body, the drive-by-cable was removed and replaced by redundant sensors.

With the ETB, the ECU fully controls it based on signals from the accelerator pedal. The throttle valve is now fully automated, controlled only by a small motor within the throttle body.

The Spectra Premium Electronic Throttle Body design benefits from a Hall Effect contactless position sensor upgrade for longer part life expectancy
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Spectra Part Number Most Popular Applications North American VIO
TB1024 2013 Volkswagen Jetta 734,634
TB1242 2012 Honda Civic 504,000
TB1140 2010 Toyota Corolla 462,005
TB1294 2016 Honda CR-V 455,875
TB1152 2015 Nissan Altima 446,272
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Part Components

Major ETB components diagram like throttle position sensor, flange, throttle body, throttle control motor and butterfly valve

How does an ETB work?

Throttle position sensors sitting atop the unit next to the control gears transmit butterfly valve positioning in real time to the ECU. This new way of function allows seamless consistency of function across all road conditions (temperature, altitude, vehicle load, etc.)

Electronic control also allows easier integration of special features such as cruise, traction, and stability control. This electronic version allows for better air-fuel ratio and emissions control.

Common ETB Failure Symptoms

  • Rough idle
  • Unreliable response to gas pedal
  • Engine stalling
  • Slow or uneven acceleration

Common ETB causes of failure

The main cause of failure on the ETB stands with the throttle position sensor. Potentiometer type sensors uses physical contact to define valve opening. Over time, wear can occur and fail without warning.

Use of Hall Effect sensors similar to those in the CMP use a moving magnetic field to define position, preventing any physical wear.

Dirt, grime, and other contaminants may also build up within the throttle valve opening making it harder to move and thereby reducing air flow and emissions control. Software or electronic (shorts) failures are also possible

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